Get your tickets to the “I’ll Be There” Awards

Each year, the DC Jobs With Justice coalition comes together to celebrate our work and recognize our leaders. Join us for this year’s “I’ll Be There” Awards! Thursday, October 26th, 2017, 6:00 – 8:00 PM All Souls Church, 1500 Harvard St NW, Washington, D.C. We are thrilled to announce this year’s “I’ll Be There” Award recipients. You can join us in honoring them at the Awards on October 26th. They are: SEIU 32BJ and UNITE HERE Local 23 for organizing victories at the DC-area airports including a $12.75 minimum wage for contract workers The NEAR Act campaign leaders for winning legislation and funding for community-led violence prevention efforts The DMV Sanctuary Congregation Network for creating a network of congregations dedicated to providing support and solidarity to neighbors, friends, and family who fear being detained, deported or profiled DC High School Walk-Out leaders for organizing a District-wide walk-out of students to show youth power and values after the 2016 presidential election Ticket pricing  Ticket = $60 Solidarity ticket = $100 (your generous donation allows us to provide tickets to other members of the community) Discount Ticket = Pay what you can You can purchase tickets here or below! This is a fundraiser event to support the organizing and advocacy work of DC Jobs With Justice. No one will be denied entrance regardless of ability to donate. Childcare and interpretation will be provided as...

Sponsor the 2017 “I’ll Be There” Awards!

It’s that time of year! On October 26, 2017, we’re hosting the “I’ll Be There” Awards to celebrate the DC Jobs With Justice coalition and recognize leaders from the community, faith institutions, labor, and student groups. Below, you will find our online payment portal for sponsoring and purchasing program book ads for the “I’ll Be There” Awards. We do, however, encourage all memberships and sponsorships to be processed directly to DC JWJ by check if possible in order to avoid online transaction fees. Check out our Ad and Sponsorship Packet for full information. Sponsorship levels: $10,000 – Champion for Justice – 2 page program book ad, speaking opportunity at the Awards, 40 tickets, logo prominently displayed in all event materials $5,000 – Movement Builder – full page ad premium placement, 20 tickets, logo prominently displayed in all event materials $2,500 – Mass Mobilizer – full page program book ad, 10 tickets, and a profile in social media and materials $1,000 – Action Hero – full page program book ad, 4 tickets, and logo display on event signage $500 – Solidarity Superstar – half page program book ad, 2 tickets, and logo display on group signage Ad space purchases: $600 – Full Page Ad in the program book $300 – Half Page Ad in the program book $150 – Quarter Page Ad in the program book Ad file formats and size specifications: All ads are one color (black) on white paper. Please send electronic files no later than 9/22/17 to illbethere@dcjwj.org. Acceptable File Formats – print ready PDF with bleed and crop marks (preferred), EPS with all fonts outlined, or native files from InDesign CC...

#Bethere2015 for the 2015 I’ll Be There Awards

Fifteen years ago, a small group of courageous labor leaders and community volunteers united to help local parking garage attendants win a union contract and sustainable, improved working conditions. Through their vision, DC Jobs with Justice was born along with the mission to protect and advance the rights of DC area workers. On 10.15.15, our community will come together to celebrate 15 years of DC Jobs with Justice at our annual fundraiser, the I’ll Be There Awards! This year’s event will be the biggest, most inspiring evening we’ve hosted because…. 1) We will honor and “roast” the career of our visionary founder, President Joslyn Williams of the Metropolitan Washington Labor Council, AFL-CIO! 2) We will honor the incredible impact of local leaders Courtney Stewart, Reverend Kendrick Curry, and Jean-Louis Ikambana! Talk about major community leaders developing the leadership and dignity of our local youth, returning citizens, and Black communities!!! 3) Eugene Puryear and Tiffany Flowers of the Stop Police Terror Project DC and #BlackLivesMatter are MC’ing this year and well, they’re kind of a big deal! 4) Incredible live performances to lift us up by DC’s very own funk, reggea, rock band Nappy Riddem, and John Harris. 5) Complimentary Shrimp cocktail. Sushi. Empanadas. Cheeses, fruits, chocolate, champagne….. need I say more? RSVP for the event here on FB today! This is a fundraiser event to support the organizing and advocacy work of DC Jobs with Justice! We are asking for a symbolic $30 at the door on the night of the event ($15 to celebrate our first 15 years of work, and $15 to support our next 15 years...

In D.C., a Call for Just Hours

This week, employees of companies like Marshalls, McDonald’s and Macy’s told nearly 100 Washington, D.C. residents gathered at Pennsylvania Avenue Baptist Church how unstable hours and so-called “just-in-time” scheduling practices take a toll on their families and their ability to make ends meet. The community hearing kicked off the launch of the DC Just Hours campaign, and gave the men and women who work in D.C.’s service industry a chance to talk about their experiences, and for them, along with representatives from community organizations and elected offices to present policy solutions for a problem ripe to be solved. Those who spoke at the hearing, hosted by the DC Jobs With Justice Workers’ Rights Board, included not only employees, but also education advocates, faith leaders and elected officials. In a report on D.C. employer scheduling practices released last month by DC Jobs With Justice along with Jobs With Justice Education Fund, DC Fiscal Policy Institute and Georgetown University’s Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, a survey of 436 respondents in the retail and restaurant/food service industries found that D.C. employees are granted too few hours on too short notice, challenging their ability to lead a good life. At the hearing, testimony given from people who work for fast food and retail companies confirmed the report’s findings. RasImani Diggs, a clerk at Marshalls described her experience asking her supervisor for additional hours: “We ask for more hours, but it’s always the same song. They say, ‘We don’t have enough,’ but then hire 15 more people.” “Just-in-time” scheduling practices, where employees are asked to come and go depending on how...

New DC JWJ Report Reveals Unfair Scheduling Practices in DC

Today, DC Jobs With Justice, Jobs With Justice Education Fund, DC Fiscal Policy Institute and Georgetown University Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor released the first-ever study on service sector scheduling practices in Washington, D.C. Read the Executive Summary here The report, “Unpredictable, Unsustainable: The Impact of Employers’ Scheduling Practices in D.C,” draws on a survey conducted in 2015 with hundreds of people employed in the District, focusing on the retail and restaurant/food service industries—the broadest citywide study of scheduling practices in the service industry to date. In line with previous research, it finds that “just in time” approaches to scheduling negatively impact many D.C. employees’ lives, often resulting in erratic and unpredictable hours for the women and men who serve our food, stock our shelves and sweep our floors. Employees are granted too few hours on too short notice, resulting in unpredictable incomes and work schedules that make it hard to budget, arrange childcare, continue with education or hold down a second job to try to make ends meet. You can read the full report here Some Key Findings: Low Pay Common: The typical employee works 32 hours per week at a pay rate of $10 per hour resulting in an annual income of approximately $16,000 More Hours Needed: Four out of five people said it was very important or somewhat important to get more hours. Second Jobs Required: Nearly one-quarter of individuals work at least one additional job. Unpredictable Schedules: A typical respondent faces a 13 hour range in weekly hours per month, receiving as little as 25 hours some weeks and a high of 38 hours...